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Archive for August, 2012

Intro

I first learned to knit when I was a kid. Like most small children, I did a few rows of garter stitch, realized it took Forever, then stopped. I’ve always been involved in crafting in some form, however; I made clothes for my dolls out of scraps out of material when I was a kid, then I jumped on the friendship bracelet craze and made hundreds of those. I tried handsewing again, made a couple of quilts, then didn’t really have an outlet for a few years.

In 2005, I was shopping in a department store and saw a knitting kit. I was drawn to it, though it was for a yoga bag and too advanced for me (which I didn’t realize at the time). I ended up using the yarn to make dishcloths, and went from there.

Although I do come from a long line of crafty people (mother, aunts, grandmother), I learned how to knit mostly on my own with help from the awesome community at Craftster, videos from Knitting Help, and Debbie Stoller’s Stitch ‘n Bitch books. After getting one of her knitting books, I found a version for crochet and picked that up too.

I love making mostly small items, amigurumi, mitts, socks, hats and scarves.

I used to have a knitting blog called k2sc1 (a wordpress blog), which I closed down for a while for various reasons. Since I’ve been making and selling amigurumi under the name Cameron Creations for the past half year, I decided to make that the name of my new blog. I’ll be posting a couple of free patterns soon, and hope to have more in the future, as well as talk about knitting and crochet in general.

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Link’s Hat

I made this hat one evening while watching a movie in my apartment in Korea, 2009. I didn’t have an idea in mind aside from “hat”, I just cast on and made it up as I went along. When it was finished, I showed it to my friend Kathleen who came up with the name and set off to knit her own after I wrote down the pattern for her.

Link is the silent main character from the Legend of Zelda games, though his hat is much pointier (and longer). The hat is divided into three sections, reminiscent of the Triforce, and I used a simple cable in each section (a more complex cable could be used in it’s place).

I bought the wool from a sale bin in Masan, Korea, unfortunately without a label (I listed the yarn that Kathleen used).

Needles: US 8/5.0mm, 1 set of 4 DPNs and 1 16” or 17” circ needle
Yarn: Bulky wool, appox 100m. (Substitute: Black Sheep Lamb’s Pride Bulky, 1 skein)
Stitch Markers

Gauge: 4” = 18sts and 28rows (row gauge is not important)

Finished Measurements:
Length from tip to start of purl rows = 5.5”
Cable (including bind-off) = 4”
Circumference at widest point = 22”

Increase Round: Kfb for the first and last stitch of each needle, k the stitches in between. Because you’re increasing at the edges every other row, ladders should not occur. One increase round adds 6 stitches.

Pattern:
Starting with DPNs, CO 6sts and divide over 3 needles. Join and knit around. Place marker at beginning of round.

Round 2: Increase Round
Round 3: Knit
(Repeat rounds 2 and 3 until piece measures 5.5” long, or desired width to fit head. Switch to circular needle when necessary. Finish with round 2.)

Cable:
(Instructions are assuming 32 sts on each needle, but that number is not important. The cable is 6sts in the middle of each needle, with an equal number of purl stitches on either side of it.)

Chb: move 3 stitches to cable needle, hold back, k3 then k3 off cable needle

Rounds 1, 2: *p13, k6, p13; rep from * 3 times
Round 3: *p13, chb, p13; rep from * 3 times
Rounds 4, 5, 6: *p13, k6, p13; rep from * 3 times

(Repeat 6 rows of the cable pattern 4 times. For a longer hat, repeat until desired length, just under the ears).

Next round: *k1, p1* around.

Bind off. The hat is designed to curl under at the edge (the cables keep it from curling too much), so a tight bind-off is better. Cut yarn and weave in ends.

(Link’s Hat by Denise Cameron © 2009 . This is a free pattern intended for personal use, and isn’t to be used to make and sell hats. If you want to put this pattern on your website or print it to give to someone else, please include a link back to my website cameroncreationsblog.wordpress.com.)

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